U.K. and E.U. Litigation

The London office has specialist attorneys who can assist in protecting the intellectual property rights of our clients from infringement, and advise clients to avoid infringing the rights of third parties.

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19.Jun.17The U.S. Supreme Court affirmed the decision of the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit...

09.Jun.17Thursday, July 20th will mark the start of the 47th annual San Diego Comic-Con International, more...

26.May.17The SCOTUS decision of May 22, 2017 in Heartland v. Kraft, stated that specific venue provisions...

21.Apr.17Ladas & Parry LLP is thankful for all of the attendees of the 2017 INTA Annual Meeting in...

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+ Qualified and Experienced UK Litigators

Our attorneys represent both claimants and defendants in disputes relating to all types of intellectual property and related rights, including trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets and domain names.  Our lawyers appear before specialist intellectual property courts in the UK and before the European Court of Justice on intellectual property matters.  In addition, we represent clients in dispute resolution actions before Nominet, the UK Top Level Domain Name Registrar.

+ Pre-Litigation Advice

We routinely handle trademark oppositions and cancellations before the registries of the UK, OHIM and France and cases involving infringement.  Our attorneys work closely with clients to fully understand the nature of their dispute, advise them on the applicable law, recommend an appropriate course of action and evaluate their likelihood of success.  At times formal litigation is not the best option for a client, and we are able to advise on arbitration, mediation and settlement as other options.

+ European Patent Office Oppositions

Our litigators actively oppose and defend European patents before the European Patent Office, and also in advising on the strategic value of doing so or not doing so. It is in such proceedings that our understanding of the differences between the United States approach to obviousness and the European approach to inventive step across the breadth of a claim becomes particularly important.